Archive for November, 2010

TomTom

Isn’t it odd to think that there was once a time when we knew where we were? Now we follow the satnav with a blind faith bordering on the mystical. I may not have a clue where I am – but I know I’ll be home in 47 minutes…
Which is why I am always so pleased to speak to the nice people at TomTom.
I don’t know whether you have one of their devices but did you know that you can ring them up and within a couple of minutes you’re talking to someone who knows what they’re talking about.
It happened this week: They’d sent me an email inviting me to download the new maps – which promptly wiped out all my favourites.
This time it was a nice young man called Mark who helped me out. I thanked him profusely. I said how comforting it was to know that I could call them with any foolish question.
“Come to think of it,” I added on the spur of the moment. “I’m always looking for people who are good on the telephone. Tell me, are you in the market for more time, more money … or possibly both?”
… actually it was not on the spur of the moment at all. But the praise was genuine. Anyway Mark said he was always in the market for more money – and I asked him if he had three minutes and eight seconds to spare because that’s how long it takes me to show someone how the money works.
I did not, at this point, mention the the name of the company.In fact I told him: “What I suggest is that I show you the money first because, if the money’s good enough then, providing the work is legal and ethical, it doesn’t really matter what it is. After all, if you were paid Wayne Rooney’s salary, is there anything you wouldn’t be prepared to do – providing, of course that it was legal and ethical?”
Mark agreed to look at the money first – and three minutes and eight seconds later, I had shown him how he could earn £500 in 90 days, £2,000 in a year and also build up an ongoing income of £500 a month – and then in maybe five years time, an ongoing income of £5,000 a month. He got really excited.
“I could do this,” he said. “I know lots of people – does it work in Europe?”
And that was were we encountered the obstacle. TomTom is a Dutch company and he was on the phone in Holland – where he lives permanently with his Dutch wife.
Ah.
We then established that the friends he had mentioned as possible business partners were also based in Holland.
Scrabbling around for a way to rescue what had appeared to be a promising conversation, I asked: “Who do you know in the UK who might like to look at this.”
He thought for a moment: “Well, there’s Damian. He’s in the UK and he’s into lots of things – property… internet marketing… I’m sure he’d go for it.”
My next question was going to be about whether he would mind passing on my number to Damian. But why take the easy route?
“Would it be OK if I phoned Damian and just ran it past him like I did with you just now?”
And that’s how I come to have one more number to call tomorrow.

TomTom

Isn’t it odd to think that there was once a time when we knew where we were? Now we follow the satnav with a blind faith bordering on the mystical. I may not have a clue where I am – but I know I’ll be home in 47 minutes…
Which is why I am always so pleased to speak to the nice people at TomTom.
I don’t know whether you have one of their devices but did you know that you can ring them up and within a couple of minutes you’re talking to someone who knows what they’re talking about.
It happened this week: They’d sent me an email inviting me to download the new maps – which promptly wiped out all my favourites.
This time it was a nice young man called Mark who helped me out. I thanked him profusely. I said how comforting it was to know that I could call them with any foolish question.
“Come to think of it,” I added on the spur of the moment. “I’m always looking for people who are good on the telephone. Tell me, are you in the market for more time, more money … or possibly both?”
… actually it was not on the spur of the moment at all. But the praise was genuine. Anyway Mark said he was always in the market for more money – and I asked him if he had three minutes and eight seconds to spare because that’s how long it takes me to show someone how the money works.
I did not, at this point, mention the company or Network Marketing in general. In fact I told him: “What I suggest is that I show you the money first because, if the money’s good enough then, providing the work is legal and ethical, it doesn’t really matter what it is. After all, if you were paid Wayne Rooney’s salary, is there anything you wouldn’t be prepared to do – providing, of course that it was legal and ethical?”
Mark agreed to look at the money first – and three minutes and eight seconds later, I had shown him how he could earn £500 in 90 days, £2,000 in a year and also build up an ongoing income of £500 a month – and then in maybe five years time, an ongoing income of £5,000 a month. He got really excited.
“I could do this,” he said. “I know lots of people – does it work in Europe?”
And that was were we encountered the obstacle. TomTom is a Dutch company and he was on the phone in Holland – where he lives permanently with his Dutch wife.
Ah.
We then established that the friends he had mentioned as possible business partners were also based in Holland.
Scrabbling around for a way to rescue what had appeared to be a promising conversation, I asked: “Who do you know in the UK who might like to look at this.”
He thought for a moment: “Well, there’s Damian. He’s in the UK and he’s into lots of things – property… internet marketing… I’m sure he’d go for it.”
My next question was going to be about whether he would mind passing on my number to Damian. But why take the easy route?
“Would it be OK if I phoned Damian and just ran it past him like I did with you just now?”
And that’s how I come to have one more number to call tomorrow.

Bad Driving

It was like being in detention. There was a good deal of banter and plenty of wry smiles as 25 motoring miscreants gathered for the “Speeding Awareness” Course.
This is what you’re offered as an alternative to a £60 fine and three penalty points – providing you were just a little bit over the speed limit. In my case it was 38mph in a 30 on the Norwich ring road and the Norfolk constabulary wrote me a nice letter saying this did not mean I was a bad driver (which is the nicest thing anyone has ever said about my driving).
To “get off”, all I had to do is pay £70 for the course and look attentive for four hours.
I’m sure it has done me some good and I will drive more responsibly in the future – but the really good news was that it gave me the opportunity to talk to a whole lot more people.
The first one was a woman at my table as we sat waiting for the course to start.
“How?” she said.
“How?….oh How? Yes, of course…”
It takes you by surprise sometimes when you wear the badge all the time and forget you have it on.
Snapping quickly into Network Marketing mode, I said brightly: “I’m glad you asked. That depends. Do you want to save money or make money?”
It turned out to be a superfluous question: She was a nurse in A&E – overworked, underpaid and rarely appreciated. She is now looking at an attractive alternative.
Then, in the break I got talking to the man on my other side. He used to work in Fleet Street in the printing works of the Sun and the News of the World in the days when I was round the corner at the Daily Mail. Then he took redundancy when Rupert Murdoch moved it all to Wapping and he started up as a taxi driver in Bury St Edmunds.
“How’s the taxi business these days?” I knew the answer: People can’t afford taxis any more. Now he worked in a warehouse and he wasn’t sure how much longer that would last.
So he’s looking too.
But it was when I was on the way home that things got really interesting: I had stopped to buy a sandwich in a tiny little village shop and was just going out to the car when I saw a young couple standing next to it reading it – people do this a lot. There are so many logos and stickers that it takes a while to read it all.
“D’you want one?” I asked.
“Want what?”
“A Mini. You can win one. Hang on, I’ve got an entry form here somewhere….”
And that was how I came to be standing by the road, drawing out a diagram of how the money works – how they could start off by making £500 in their first 90 days, then £2,000 in their first year and how that would give them a residual income of £500 a month – and how, in time that would grow to £5,000 a month, with them still putting in only a few hours a week.
They watched, goggle eyed. Then we discovered that they were expecting a baby… how the young man was out of work… how this was exactly what they were looking for. He could borrow the money to get started… his parents had asked him what he wanted for Christmas…”
I left them with a DVD and drove home (slowly) smiling to myself at the prospect of helping a nice young couple get started on the road to financial independence.
They rang again when I got home, urging me to be patient. It was just a question of going to see his parents…
I hope we can give them a Happy Christmas.

Modesty

Modesty is a wasted virtue! And so today I am turning the blog over to Tim Griffiths whom I have never met but who circulated this the other day:
Hi everyone, I am down in Ron’s downline somewhere and I want to tell you about my week.
Now if you weren’t at MAD this year, you must be. If you still haven’t watched John Passmore speech on the extranet, you definitely are.
So he said – “I joined and told my family. They said ‘we will see how you get on with it’. And whichever way you re-arrange those words it doesn’t make ‘yes’.”
So I became a Distributor last summer. I told my Mum & Dad and it was like French & Saunders. My Dad actually said “you know where you are with BT”. My cousin Gary said he would take a look at my website if I had one. But he decided to make babies instead with his wife. My cousin Jenni said “no” as she didn’t see the point as she is living with her parents again. So I had failed.
Wel,l whilst on a coach somewhere outside Hambury this summer with my cousin Gary on the way to the airport, he asked: “Are you still doing that phone & broadband thing?”
I said “yes”. So after a four hour delay at Lubeck-Hamburg airport and a drive back to his, he signed up to Broadcall and a Cashback card.
My parents remained a mystery still – as in the meantime they had signed up to AOL at higher prices than I could offer. But two weeks ago my mother phoned up and said their energy supplier had lowered their direct debit in the spring and phoned to say this week they were putting it up again. “Can you do me a quote?” she asked. So I did. I told her how much she could save by having her home phone with us as well: Total saving of £250 a year. Then I told her about the Cashback card and ASDA. She said ASDA are taking over the co-op up the road in Harwich in the New Year. Result! She signed up.
There’s a family get together this weekend. Finally, after nearly 18 months I have sold a mobile phone! My cousin Jenni signed up for Freetext + Cashback card. My Aunt said: “Your Mum has mentioned this Utility thing…”
She signed up for phone, broadband, electricity and a Cashback card. Sainsbury’s deliver her shopping every week! Fantastic!
And then I went around my parents for a cuppa before heading back to South , I told my Mum they had all signed up and my cousin had taken a mobile.
“Oh I fancy a new mobile” she said. So I added another mobile
So you see, I failed to start with. But just like John Passmore said at MAD, they will sign up! Three customers, 8 services, 3 Cashback cards in a week. And another person who said he wants me to call on Wednesday so I can arrange a time for him to say yes!
So if you’re in the early stages and some people have said no. Never give up, keep dropping hints, and eventually they will sign up!
If everyone in Ron’s group signs up 3 customers this week, how much will we have grown our great club by!
Yours
Tim Griffiths
Qualified Executive (but hopefully for not much longer!)

Frinton-on-Sea

Do you know Frinton-on-Sea? Somehow this genteel little seaside resort on the Essex coast got left behind by the passage of time. Now it languishes permanently in a sort of parallel universe where the clocks stopped in 1955. The all-powerful Frinton Residents Association sees to it that the 20th Century is accepted grudgingly – one bitter morsel at a time.
They fought against the opening of a Fish and Chip Shop. They appealed relentlessly to try and stop Wetherspoons getting planning permission to open a pub – you still can’t buy and ice cream on the beach.
And now, I discover, the barricades are up against the advance of Broadband.
The gentleman knew all about the company. He was an avid reader of Which? Magazine (I imagined him sitting up late into the night poring over it by the light of a 15W bulb). I began to explain how the club works and everything went well until we came to the idea of other people paying his electricity bill.
“Who?” he wanted to know, in the tone he might reserve for foreigners moving into the town or the Olde Copper Kettle Teashop serving Lattes.
Somewhat laboriously I explained that he could get 35 retail chains from M&S to Pizza Express to pay his electricity bill.
I shouldn’t have mentioned Pizza.
“We buy everything at Tesco’s,” he insisted. “Everything…”
Never mind, he could still save money when he shopped online…
“Too expensive,” he exploded.
Now this stumped me. How could it be too expensive to shop online?
“The dial-up charges of course. The dial-up charges are cripplingly expensive.”
And that was how we discovered that tucked away in Frinton-on-Sea is a man who pays £14 a month dial-up charges, £13 a month BT line rental and £17 a month for his calls – a total of £44 a month –
when I could give him all of that for £20 a month and throw in broadband, his router and free calls to the top ten international desinations (although of course he never calls anyone abroad).
It was at this point his wife demanded to know why it all had to be so complicated and I made the mistake of calling her by her Christian name.
“What gives you the right to call me by my Christian name?” she demanded. “You don’t know me!”
Sometimes you just have to admit defeat.
“I’m sorry,” I said sadly. “I’m afraid you don’t qualify.”
“Don’t qualify! Don’t qualify! What do you mean we don’t qualify?”
“I mean that we only invite happy smiley people who want to save money to join our club – and you don’t qualify.”
And with that I left… and in the next half an hour I received a call from a lady in Monmouthshire who wanted Broadband and had been given my number. Then there was another call from the practice manager at a doctor’s surgery who needed cheaper energy – and also ran two fish and chip shops.
And when I got home my neighbour who is a Utilities Analyst and has been looking at the club for at least three years with a view to becoming a distributor came knocking on my door saying: “Can I have an appointment?”
So with a deep breath and a shuddering sigh, I am going to forget all about Frinton-on-Sea.
Of course, I know I won’t be allowed to. He’ll probably complain.

Listening…

At the top of the page it says they told me to talk to everyone – and most of the time that’s what this is about.
But just to show you that it can work the other way, this is what happened when someone talked to me:
We had taken six children to Bewilderwood. I suppose you could call it a theme park – but with a difference: Instead of flashing lights and screaming roller-coasters there is a wonderful collection of climbing frames and slides and aerial walkways all hidden away in a Norfolk woodland. The man beside me, watching the children cavorting overhead observed: “In my day we built our own tree-houses.”
And so he had. He went on to tell me about the incredible construction he and his pals had put together 35ft up an oak tree – all made out of odds ends they had found lying around on the farm.
“It all came to an end when one of the lads fell out of the tree and broke his arm.” he said. “His Mum gave him a clip round the ear and the grown ups came and took our house down – we had to go to all the trouble of building another one deeper in the woods…”
And so we fell to talking – and this was his story: He and his wife had moved into a bungalow when the children left home. Retirement was just a couple of years away and they had plans to travel a bit and enjoy the peaceful life. But then my new aquaintance found himself in court watching a judge decide the fate of their two young grandsons – both under the age of five.
The boys’ mother had decided she couldn’t cope and handed them over to the social services – who explained that foster-care was not a long term solution. The judge observed matter of factly that unless a family member was prepared to take them, then the boys would be put up for adoption.
“What could I do,” said the man beside me. “I couldn’t just sit there and say nothing so I stood up and said we’d take them.”
It was only later that he told his wife about this.
Standing in a woodland with the shouts of a hundred children all around us, it was an extraordinary story to hear.
“So we moved back into a bigger house,” he said. “And I can’t see myself retiring now…”
So what do you think? Do you think I should have shaken my head at the way of the world and said: “Good for you,” and wished him well – or do you think I should have told him about what I do? How he could use a bit of time every week to build up an income which would allow him to retire in a few years and provide for all the children’s needs far into the future – something to solve all his problems.
What do you think?

Go For No

I’ve been listening to “Mastering Go for NO” which is the CD set to accompany the book I mentioned some time ago – and isn’t it amazing how we hear of a good idea, adopt it, find it works – and then gradually stop doing it!
Well, the CDs have got me back on track and first thing this morning I was due to go and see the man from Community Speedwatch – I wrote about him the other week.
He had listened politely and then insisted he wanted to check out the company, read the small print…he wanted to say “No” but was far too polite to just come out with it.
So that was fine. We agreed that I would call again today for his answer and this time it was a final no. His reason: “I’m getting old and I don’t like change.”
When you think about it that is probably the only valid reason there is for saying no.
“That’s fine,” I said. “You see, I like hearing people say “No” because every day I try and get ten people to say it. That way I don’t mind at all.”
At that point he became terribly effusive – thanking me so much for showing him, thanking me for being so good about the fact that he didn’t want to join.
And with that, he pressed a bottle of Rioja on me.
“No, no, no,” I said.
“Yes, yes, yes,” he said.

What’s it all about?

This is the diary of a successful Multi-Level Marketer making money from home and fitting a part-time business into a busy life.
Over the years it has developed but the objective remains the same: To demonstrate how anyone can build a successful network marketing business in "the nooks and crannies of the day".
Eventually this spawned a training programme which I called The Cold Market Academy. This began as a seminar available only to MLM-ers working with my company. Then it went online as an e-learning course.
Now it is a book available through Amazon: MLM, Network Marketing and the Secret of the Free Prize Draw (you can see more about this on the "MLM Prize Draw" tab above.)
But at the heart of the Network Marketing Blog is the answer to the two most common questions people ask when they look at this business - and the two biggest challenges they face when they start:
1. I'm not a salesperson.
2. I don't have the time.
These are genuine concerns and all too often they get brushed aside: "Don't worry about that. We'll show you how..."
This blog is designed to show how it works in reality and in real time - how anyone, no matter how busy, can work their business consistently in small fragments of time. Because that's all you need; just a few seconds to find out if someone's interested.
And please bear in mind the entries here are only a tiny snapshot of the daily activity. Most of what goes on would make very dull reading indeed: Making calls from the list ... adding names to the list...making calls from the list...
As for being a salesperson: Have a look and decide for yourself.
Is it sales?
Let's say you call on a friend unexpectedly and find them up to their ankles in water and battling with a burst pipe.
Imagine it: There they are, soaked to the skin, trying to wrap a towel round the leak while they shout: "I rang the plumber but all I get is the Ansaphone..."
Honestly now, would you ignore their plight or would you volunteer the number of your own plumber.
Would you do what you could to help them or would you consider that going into "sales" on behalf of the plumber would be beneath you?
And what would your friend say when they realised you had deliberately chosen to leave them struggling to stem the flow and all because you felt embarrassed about "selling" something.
Network marketing is all about spreading good news and it's all about helping people.

If you're thinking of getting into Network Marketing - or already in it but not making enough money - contact me at info@networkmarketingblog.org.uk

About Me

John Passmore,
United Kingdom.

For 25 years I was a newspaper reporter - ending up as Chief Correspondent for the London Evening Standard. Then I gave it all up and, with my wife, set out to live the simple life on a small boat while writing a column for the Daily Telegraph. Five years and two children later we moved ashore - and five years and another two children after that I ran out of money. Nobody wanted to give me a job and I couldn't afford to start a conventional business. Then at a craft fair in our local community hall, somebody showed me network marketing. It was described as a home-based business that would provide anyone with a second income if they were prepared to work for it. I was sceptical. There were claims of high earnings and something called a "residual income". But what if it did work? And besides what alternative did I have? So I threw myself into it wholeheartedly (which is the only way to succeed at anything). I'm not saying it was easy or there were never moments of doubt but if you're prepared to learn and determined never to give up, then there is a statistical certainty that you will make money. I started in April 2005. I was broke and embarrassed. Today I have no money worries whatsoever.